Portable Feeds

My current job is in downtown DenverDowntown Denver is quite unlike the other parts of the metro area in which I have worked. The Tech Center and Interlocken both feel a little stifled and boring to me. Longmont feels a bit like a small home town, which is cool, but not in a super productive way.. When I got this job I decided that I would use mass transitRTD is pretty great, except when it is really cold. A few weeks ago I had to wait for an hour in 0 degree weather for the bus. for my commute. It only takes a few more minutes that driving and I really appreciate getting that hour of commute time, round trip, back to do something useful.

My first thought was that I could use that time to catch up on my reading. There are a lot of books in my queue and I just do not get the time to read at homeTime to read is one that I did not anticipate losing when we had kids. With 4 month old and a 2 year old there is free time, but it comes in 5-10 minute blocks. That means that if I try to read with my kids around I just don’t make much progress for the time spent.. My second thought was, “Ooh, if I had a e-book reader I could catch up on my feeds on the bus”. I looked around but all the e-book readers are expensive, low resolution and most of them only support proprietary formats. So I gave up on portable feed reading and have just been catching up on my reading.

I thought of this again today because the guys over at Evilsoft pointed out Sony’s new e-book reader, which is at least high resolution. They also noted that aggregation is a potential market for e-book readers. If I were an e-book reader manufacturer the I would definite be providing an aggregator, or at the very least a non-proprietary format that third party aggregators could use. Sony’s e-book reader is still too expensive, it is the price of a budget PC, but I think this e-book thing will happen sooner or later. I, for one, look forward to reading my subscriptions at near print resolution.